Normal Topic CIA Polygraph 2018 (Read 10531 times)
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CIA Polygraph 2018
Mar 19th, 2018 at 4:52am
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Can anyone who has had a recent poly (e.g., within last 12 months) confirm that the CIA is still using the "Relevant/Irrelevant" test format?

Also, would like to hear how the experience went, including whether you passed, failed, etc. Would also like to know whether you made any admissions or employed any CMs.

Thanks.
  
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Re: CIA Polygraph 2018
Reply #1 - Mar 19th, 2018 at 6:33am
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They still use it.  Mental countermeasures work best.  As mentioned very briefly in TLBTLD book on page151, use mental countermeasures on different Relevant questions for the CIA relevant/irrelevant test.  If you can spike your charts when they ask "have you ever had contact with a foreign government" on one question set, then use mental countermeasures to spike your charts on another relevant question such as "have you ever committed a crime for which you weren't caught" on a different question set, then you can pass.  The examiner will not know what to think when you react on different questions. 

They will always accuse you of using countermeasures or hiding something, and may even use the example of you having "a hundred bodies buried in your back yard".  Ignore this and do not admit to anything.  Do not even admit to taking pens from work, speeding, trying an illegal drug including marijuana, or driving a car after having a few drinks if you were not arrested for DUI.  If you did smoke a little pot, your friends should know to keep their mouth shut anyway, code of silence.  Do not even admit to having ever done polygraph research.  The CIA is disqualifying people who admit to visiting Antipolygraph.org.  The CIA tries to make you think that "everyone has done something bad" in regards to your naughty background so that you will open up to them. Do not fall for this trap. Do not tell the your porn habits.  Do not give them any ammo.  Do no incriminate yourself by trying to be honest and telling them things they would never find out about.  The CIA will not audit your phone or computer browsing history.  Tell them nothing.  When they get to the point that they threaten to end your employment application because you are not telling them anything, tell them "okay, fine, end it, I will find another job, I have nothing to hide and have already told you everything". 

The CIA polygraph is easy to beat.  I know.  I have done it.  I was in a drunken bar fight where my friends and I committed assault and battery on a few assholes outside the bar, and we did not pay for our drinks.  I also exposed myself on the street to a few ladies that night.  Several crimes here.  This was just weeks before my poly.  Still passed and am employed by CIA to this day.  I hope they never find that surveillance footage!

Tell the CIA nothing.  Good luck, and do not mention my screen name or this post when you take that poly.

Another good thread for you to continue:https://antipolygraph.org/cgi-bin/forums/YaBB.pl?num=1308957294

  
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Reply #2 - Mar 19th, 2018 at 9:41am
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The question posted by "CleverGirl" and the reply posted by "CleverPolyBeater" were both posted from the same IP address, suggesting a common authorship.
  

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Re: CIA Polygraph 2018
Reply #3 - Mar 19th, 2018 at 2:06pm
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Administrator wrote on Mar 19th, 2018 at 9:41am:
The question posted by "CleverGirl" and the reply posted by "CleverPolyBeater" were both posted from the same IP address, suggesting a common authorship.


As per George's advice, I used/am using the Tor network and browser. So, the probability of the reply coming from the same exit node/IP address, after I logged off of the Tor network, is in the hundreds of millions. Just because someone else has "Clever" in their screen name doesn't necessarily mean that we are the same poster. Yes, I realize that I could have posted a reply to my original post, if that would make any sense. And, I suppose there's no way to prove that I didn't, considering that I'm posting as a guest. Either way, I'm starting to doubt the ability of this website to accurately log IP addresses.
  
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Re: CIA Polygraph 2018
Reply #4 - Mar 19th, 2018 at 2:37pm
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They still use it.  Mental countermeasures work best.  As mentioned very briefly in TLBTLD book on page151, use mental countermeasures on different Relevant questions for the CIA relevant/irrelevant test.  If you can spike your charts when they ask "have you ever had contact with a foreign government" on one question set, then use mental countermeasures to spike your charts on another relevant question such as "have you ever committed a crime for which you weren't caught" on a different question set, then you can pass.  The examiner will not know what to think when you react on different questions. 

They will always accuse you of using countermeasures or hiding something, and may even use the example of you having "a hundred bodies buried in your back yard".  Ignore this and do not admit to anything.  Do not even admit to taking pens from work, speeding, trying an illegal drug including marijuana, or driving a car after having a few drinks if you were not arrested for DUI.  If you did smoke a little pot, your friends should know to keep their mouth shut anyway, code of silence.  Do not even admit to having ever done polygraph research.  The CIA is disqualifying people who admit to visiting Antipolygraph.org.  The CIA tries to make you think that "everyone has done something bad" in regards to your naughty background so that you will open up to them. Do not fall for this trap. Do not tell the your porn habits.  Do not give them any ammo.  Do no incriminate yourself by trying to be honest and telling them things they would never find out about.  The CIA will not audit your phone or computer browsing history.  Tell them nothing.  When they get to the point that they threaten to end your employment application because you are not telling them anything, tell them "okay, fine, end it, I will find another job, I have nothing to hide and have already told you everything". 

The CIA polygraph is easy to beat.  I know.  I have done it.  I was in a drunken bar fight where my friends and I committed assault and battery on a few assholes outside the bar, and we did not pay for our drinks.  I also exposed myself on the street to a few ladies that night.  Several crimes here.  This was just weeks before my poly.  Still passed and am employed by CIA to this day.  I hope they never find that surveillance footage!

Tell the CIA nothing.  Good luck, and do not mention my screen name or this post when you take that poly.

Another good thread for you to continue:https://antipolygraph.org/cgi-bin/forums/YaBB.pl?num=1308957294



Really appreciate a timely and thorough response. Like everyone else on here, I'm innocent for the most part when it comes to crimes, finances, sexual deviance, yada yada yada. The only issues I've had, I already disclosed to the security officer who called after I submitted my SF-86 — by CIA standards, they were very minor, isolated issues that occurred more than 10 years ago. Few questions:

1. Is "have you ever committed a crime for which you weren't caught" a relevant question? It seems like the probable-lie control question. If so, as per TLBTLD, I would think they would only add it if there weren't any significant responses to the Relevant questions.

2. As per TLBTLD, should one reiterate these previously reported, minor admissions during the pre-test interview to establish forthrightness and credibility?

3. For the Irrelevant/Relevant test, if there are questions that one "is not doing well on," like prior drug use, do the examiners continue with the regular Irrelevant/Relevant testing, or do they move to "break-down" format to hone in on specifics?

4. What should one do if poly session 1 and 2 remain "inconclusive," and you are asked if you want to take a third poly? From my reading, it seems like people who agree to a third poly are rejected; whereas, some people who have turned down the third poly have actually moved forward to the background investigation.

Thanks.
  
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Re: CIA Polygraph 2018
Reply #5 - Mar 20th, 2018 at 2:21am
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Quote:
Administrator wrote on Mar 19th, 2018 at 9:41am:
The question posted by "CleverGirl" and the reply posted by "CleverPolyBeater" were both posted from the same IP address, suggesting a common authorship.


As per George's advice, I used/am using the Tor network and browser. So, the probability of the reply coming from the same exit node/IP address, after I logged off of the Tor network, is in the hundreds of millions. Just because someone else has "Clever" in their screen name doesn't necessarily mean that we are the same poster. Yes, I realize that I could have posted a reply to my original post, if that would make any sense. And, I suppose there's no way to prove that I didn't, considering that I'm posting as a guest. Either way, I'm starting to doubt the ability of this website to accurately log IP addresses.


George/Admin, I assure you that I am not the same person as CleverGirl.  I am also using the Tor Browser and posting from a non-U.S. location for more anonymity.  I am surprised that two Tor users can have the same IP address, as I thought there were an infinite number of nodes in the Tor network so the chances would be very slim to have the same IP as another user.  I used the name CleverPolyBeater just for kicks since the OP was CleverGirl.  You should be able to tell by our different writing styles that we are two different people, and it makes no since for one of us to reply to our own post.  That is something the pro-polygraphers on this site would do to boost their polygraph claims.  I think CleverGirl and I are both against polygraph abuse.


Quote:
Quote:
They still use it.  Mental countermeasures work best.  As mentioned very briefly in TLBTLD book on page151, use mental countermeasures on different Relevant questions for the CIA relevant/irrelevant test.  If you can spike your charts when they ask "have you ever had contact with a foreign government" on one question set, then use mental countermeasures to spike your charts on another relevant question such as "have you ever committed a crime for which you weren't caught" on a different question set, then you can pass.  The examiner will not know what to think when you react on different questions. 

They will always accuse you of using countermeasures or hiding something, and may even use the example of you having "a hundred bodies buried in your back yard".  Ignore this and do not admit to anything.  Do not even admit to taking pens from work, speeding, trying an illegal drug including marijuana, or driving a car after having a few drinks if you were not arrested for DUI.  If you did smoke a little pot, your friends should know to keep their mouth shut anyway, code of silence.  Do not even admit to having ever done polygraph research.  The CIA is disqualifying people who admit to visiting Antipolygraph.org.  The CIA tries to make you think that "everyone has done something bad" in regards to your naughty background so that you will open up to them. Do not fall for this trap. Do not tell the your porn habits.  Do not give them any ammo.  Do no incriminate yourself by trying to be honest and telling them things they would never find out about.  The CIA will not audit your phone or computer browsing history.  Tell them nothing.  When they get to the point that they threaten to end your employment application because you are not telling them anything, tell them "okay, fine, end it, I will find another job, I have nothing to hide and have already told you everything". 

The CIA polygraph is easy to beat.  I know.  I have done it.  I was in a drunken bar fight where my friends and I committed assault and battery on a few assholes outside the bar, and we did not pay for our drinks.  I also exposed myself on the street to a few ladies that night.  Several crimes here.  This was just weeks before my poly.  Still passed and am employed by CIA to this day.  I hope they never find that surveillance footage!

Tell the CIA nothing.  Good luck, and do not mention my screen name or this post when you take that poly.

Another good thread for you to continue:https://antipolygraph.org/cgi-bin/forums/YaBB.pl?num=1308957294



Really appreciate a timely and thorough response. Like everyone else on here, I'm innocent for the most part when it comes to crimes, finances, sexual deviance, yada yada yada. The only issues I've had, I already disclosed to the security officer who called after I submitted my SF-86 — by CIA standards, they were very minor, isolated issues that occurred more than 10 years ago. Few questions:

1. Is "have you ever committed a crime for which you weren't caught" a relevant question? It seems like the probable-lie control question. If so, as per TLBTLD, I would think they would only add it if there weren't any significant responses to the Relevant questions.

2. As per TLBTLD, should one reiterate these previously reported, minor admissions during the pre-test interview to establish forthrightness and credibility?

3. For the Irrelevant/Relevant test, if there are questions that one "is not doing well on," like prior drug use, do the examiners continue with the regular Irrelevant/Relevant testing, or do they move to "break-down" format to hone in on specifics?

4. What should one do if poly session 1 and 2 remain "inconclusive," and you are asked if you want to take a third poly? From my reading, it seems like people who agree to a third poly are rejected; whereas, some people who have turned down the third poly have actually moved forward to the background investigation.

Thanks.


1.  This is the "cover all" question for the lifestyle portion of the full-scope polygraph.  Yes it is relevant.  Think about it, questions about illegal drugs, defaulting on federal loans, cheating taxes, lying on your application, etc. are pretty much all crimes.  They use this question to see what you will divulge, and then they dig deeper in that area.  They don't have time to ask specifics about everything you have done that may be illegal.  For the counterintelligence portion, having foreign contacts is not a crime, so they have to be more specific about what they think is a national security risk.  Too many friends in Russia, China, Iran, Syria, North Korea, are disqualifiers.

In the link I posted above, https://antipolygraph.org/cgi-bin/forums/YaBB.pl?num=1308957294, they list the same polygraph questions that I was asked when I took the poly sometime between 1 week and 1 decade ago.  Sorry,  I don't want to give my exact polygraph dates because it could give away clues about my identity.

2. I would say yes.  Anything you have already told them, or that is "on record" (like police reports, HR reports from a previous job, IRS tax liens, etc.) is something they can find out anyway.  So yes, be forthright and just reiterate what you already told them.

3.  Once the actual test starts, the questions will not change during the test.  The polygraphers will hone in on questions you are "not doing well on" during the post-test, also known as the interrogation.  In fact, if you tell them things you want to "get off your chest" (also known as self-incrimination) during the pre-test, they will drill you on those specifics at that time as well.  However, "not doing well" is a bullshit ruse.  You never see your charts, so the polygrapher will say this to see what you will confess to  because they need some sort of lead to interrogate you on.  I was told I was "not doing well" each time I took a poly and they waited for me to start talking before they dug in.  So do not fall for this.  Tell them all the questions were fine, nothing bothered you, you have no additional information to provide, and STICK TO THIS.  If you start saying that you were troubled by finance questions, they will ask about your finances.  If you told them you were troubled by crime questions and were thinking about some porn you saw at work, they will ask if it was underage porn, or disqualify you for looking at any time of porn while at work.  Do not crack under this pressure.  They adapt the polygraph, pretest, and post-tests to what applicants tell them, just like a police interrogation.  There are too many specific issues in the world for the polygraphers to ask about everything in detail.

4. I noticed the same thing, accepting a third poly rejects many applicants.  I do not know what to say.  Maybe the CIA assumes someone will perfect their countermeasures by the third poly.  I have no advice here, but I would probably reject the third poly.  An inconclusive test is normal.  Nothing to fret.

Good luck.

  
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Reply #6 - Mar 20th, 2018 at 8:30am
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Based on Tor metrics, the odds of two different Tor users randomly posting from the same Tor exit node from which CleverGirl and CleverPolyBeater posted (1 hour and 41 minutes apart) was 1 in 250,000.

Reader discretion is advised.
  

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Re: CIA Polygraph 2018
Reply #7 - Mar 20th, 2018 at 3:18pm
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Administrator wrote on Mar 20th, 2018 at 8:30am:
Based on Tor metrics, the odds of two different Tor users randomly posting from the same Tor exit node from which CleverGirl and CleverPolyBeater posted (1 hour and 41 minutes apart) was 1 in 250,000.

Reader discretion is advised.


Hey CleverGirl, I am at a loss for words here.  I honestly don't know how the hell we have the same IP address, but because of this the Admin has a valid conspiracy theory that we are the same person.  This is a rather eerie coincidence.   I tried to Google up how this could happen with Tor, but have no luck.  Any thoughts on your end?

Anyway, the Admin advises "reader discretion".  Okay, fine.   Be advised. But, there is nothing here that differs from every other CIA recruitment, polygraph, and pre-employment processing post that you can find in this forum, the FederalSoup forum, and other forums online.  So you can corroborate this with other stories from around the web.  They all say the same thing.  When you take the polygraph in Chantilly VA at Dulles Discovery, prepare to be accused of hiding information and to be interrogated.  It really does not matter if it is the CIA or FBI and if they use irrelevant or control questions, just know to use mental countermeasures on the control questions or on different sets of relevant questions and don't give any disqualifying information.  Breathing countermeasures may be detected if used incorrectly because of the breathing monitoring tubes around your chest.  There is no sensor for brain activity in the polygraph, and let us hope there never is because it would take a licensed neurologist to accurately decipher the polygraph charts at that point.  Remember the number one rule, DO NOT CONFESS TO ANYTHING.  No matter how minor you think it is, talking just gives way for futher interrogation until you say something that will axe your application.  Downloading music and movies illegally will disqualify you too, so don't tell them you do this.  Deny deny deny.  They will not come to your house and check your hard drives.  Most applicants are disqualified because of something they said, not because of spikey charts.  I do not have a reference link for this because it is classified.

If you think I am pulling your chain and you want to go into the polygraph on your own accord and rely on your honesty, you are free to do so.  Remember, polygraphers and law enforcement agencies love when people are willing to make statements and talk to them.  It is how they gather incriminating evidence, or application disqualifying evidence.  As the admin says, use your own discretion.
  
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Re: CIA Polygraph 2018
Reply #8 - Mar 20th, 2018 at 3:27pm
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Quote:
Quote:
Administrator wrote on Mar 19th, 2018 at 9:41am:
The question posted by "CleverGirl" and the reply posted by "CleverPolyBeater" were both posted from the same IP address, suggesting a common authorship.


As per George's advice, I used/am using the Tor network and browser. So, the probability of the reply coming from the same exit node/IP address, after I logged off of the Tor network, is in the hundreds of millions. Just because someone else has "Clever" in their screen name doesn't necessarily mean that we are the same poster. Yes, I realize that I could have posted a reply to my original post, if that would make any sense. And, I suppose there's no way to prove that I didn't, considering that I'm posting as a guest. Either way, I'm starting to doubt the ability of this website to accurately log IP addresses.


George/Admin, I assure you that I am not the same person as CleverGirl.  I am also using the Tor Browser and posting from a non-U.S. location for more anonymity.  I am surprised that two Tor users can have the same IP address, as I thought there were an infinite number of nodes in the Tor network so the chances would be very slim to have the same IP as another user.  I used the name CleverPolyBeater just for kicks since the OP was CleverGirl.  You should be able to tell by our different writing styles that we are two different people, and it makes no since for one of us to reply to our own post.  That is something the pro-polygraphers on this site would do to boost their polygraph claims.  I think CleverGirl and I are both against polygraph abuse.


Quote:
Quote:
They still use it.  Mental countermeasures work best.  As mentioned very briefly in TLBTLD book on page151, use mental countermeasures on different Relevant questions for the CIA relevant/irrelevant test.  If you can spike your charts when they ask "have you ever had contact with a foreign government" on one question set, then use mental countermeasures to spike your charts on another relevant question such as "have you ever committed a crime for which you weren't caught" on a different question set, then you can pass.  The examiner will not know what to think when you react on different questions. 

They will always accuse you of using countermeasures or hiding something, and may even use the example of you having "a hundred bodies buried in your back yard".  Ignore this and do not admit to anything.  Do not even admit to taking pens from work, speeding, trying an illegal drug including marijuana, or driving a car after having a few drinks if you were not arrested for DUI.  If you did smoke a little pot, your friends should know to keep their mouth shut anyway, code of silence.  Do not even admit to having ever done polygraph research.  The CIA is disqualifying people who admit to visiting Antipolygraph.org.  The CIA tries to make you think that "everyone has done something bad" in regards to your naughty background so that you will open up to them. Do not fall for this trap. Do not tell the your porn habits.  Do not give them any ammo.  Do no incriminate yourself by trying to be honest and telling them things they would never find out about.  The CIA will not audit your phone or computer browsing history.  Tell them nothing.  When they get to the point that they threaten to end your employment application because you are not telling them anything, tell them "okay, fine, end it, I will find another job, I have nothing to hide and have already told you everything". 

The CIA polygraph is easy to beat.  I know.  I have done it.  I was in a drunken bar fight where my friends and I committed assault and battery on a few assholes outside the bar, and we did not pay for our drinks.  I also exposed myself on the street to a few ladies that night.  Several crimes here.  This was just weeks before my poly.  Still passed and am employed by CIA to this day.  I hope they never find that surveillance footage!

Tell the CIA nothing.  Good luck, and do not mention my screen name or this post when you take that poly.

Another good thread for you to continue:https://antipolygraph.org/cgi-bin/forums/YaBB.pl?num=1308957294



Really appreciate a timely and thorough response. Like everyone else on here, I'm innocent for the most part when it comes to crimes, finances, sexual deviance, yada yada yada. The only issues I've had, I already disclosed to the security officer who called after I submitted my SF-86 — by CIA standards, they were very minor, isolated issues that occurred more than 10 years ago. Few questions:

1. Is "have you ever committed a crime for which you weren't caught" a relevant question? It seems like the probable-lie control question. If so, as per TLBTLD, I would think they would only add it if there weren't any significant responses to the Relevant questions.

2. As per TLBTLD, should one reiterate these previously reported, minor admissions during the pre-test interview to establish forthrightness and credibility?

3. For the Irrelevant/Relevant test, if there are questions that one "is not doing well on," like prior drug use, do the examiners continue with the regular Irrelevant/Relevant testing, or do they move to "break-down" format to hone in on specifics?

4. What should one do if poly session 1 and 2 remain "inconclusive," and you are asked if you want to take a third poly? From my reading, it seems like people who agree to a third poly are rejected; whereas, some people who have turned down the third poly have actually moved forward to the background investigation.

Thanks.


1.  This is the "cover all" question for the lifestyle portion of the full-scope polygraph.  Yes it is relevant.  Think about it, questions about illegal drugs, defaulting on federal loans, cheating taxes, lying on your application, etc. are pretty much all crimes.  They use this question to see what you will divulge, and then they dig deeper in that area.  They don't have time to ask specifics about everything you have done that may be illegal.  For the counterintelligence portion, having foreign contacts is not a crime, so they have to be more specific about what they think is a national security risk.  Too many friends in Russia, China, Iran, Syria, North Korea, are disqualifiers.

In the link I posted above, https://antipolygraph.org/cgi-bin/forums/YaBB.pl?num=1308957294, they list the same polygraph questions that I was asked when I took the poly sometime between 1 week and 1 decade ago.  Sorry,  I don't want to give my exact polygraph dates because it could give away clues about my identity.

2. I would say yes.  Anything you have already told them, or that is "on record" (like police reports, HR reports from a previous job, IRS tax liens, etc.) is something they can find out anyway.  So yes, be forthright and just reiterate what you already told them.

3.  Once the actual test starts, the questions will not change during the test.  The polygraphers will hone in on questions you are "not doing well on" during the post-test, also known as the interrogation.  In fact, if you tell them things you want to "get off your chest" (also known as self-incrimination) during the pre-test, they will drill you on those specifics at that time as well.  However, "not doing well" is a bullshit ruse.  You never see your charts, so the polygrapher will say this to see what you will confess to  because they need some sort of lead to interrogate you on.  I was told I was "not doing well" each time I took a poly and they waited for me to start talking before they dug in.  So do not fall for this.  Tell them all the questions were fine, nothing bothered you, you have no additional information to provide, and STICK TO THIS.  If you start saying that you were troubled by finance questions, they will ask about your finances.  If you told them you were troubled by crime questions and were thinking about some porn you saw at work, they will ask if it was underage porn, or disqualify you for looking at any time of porn while at work.  Do not crack under this pressure.  They adapt the polygraph, pretest, and post-tests to what applicants tell them, just like a police interrogation.  There are too many specific issues in the world for the polygraphers to ask about everything in detail.

4. I noticed the same thing, accepting a third poly rejects many applicants.  I do not know what to say.  Maybe the CIA assumes someone will perfect their countermeasures by the third poly.  I have no advice here, but I would probably reject the third poly.  An inconclusive test is normal.  Nothing to fret.

Good luck.



This is great information. I really appreciate your stepping up – and even putting yourself at potential risk – to offer explanations and clarifications. As per your request and common sense, I won't be mentioning anything about this or antipolygraph.org — NO ADMISSIONS. I wish you the best of luck in your endeavors, and I will likely report back sometime in the future to disclose the results.
  
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Re: CIA Polygraph 2018
Reply #9 - Jun 21st, 2018 at 6:22am
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Administrator wrote on Mar 20th, 2018 at 8:30am:
Based on Tor metrics, the odds of two different Tor users randomly posting from the same Tor exit node from which CleverGirl and CleverPolyBeater posted (1 hour and 41 minutes apart) was 1 in 250,000.

Reader discretion is advised.


There may be that many exit nodes but the nodes which advertise higher bandwidth will carry more traffic than others. But this behavior is still circumspect.

I suspect that, as snowden said, people from the three letter agencies enter forums to fill it with garbage to push out the real discussions that they are trying to censor.
« Last Edit: Jun 21st, 2018 at 7:26am by dying2die »  
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