Normal Topic It's about time that sombody admitted this... (Read 2253 times)
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It's about time that sombody admitted this...
Mar 24th, 2012 at 5:37am
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http://blogs.cio.com/security/16923/dod-networks-completely-compromised-experts-...
http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/experts-tell-senate-government-networks-owned-...

I can't believe that the doors are this badly secured from the people whom we depend on to, tersely-put, lock those doors.

I'm telling you now, it's just insane what's been being reported as of late.  I'm having trouble not vomiting after this, considering the recent loss of a remote-controlled drone and the discovery of a trojan horse on the C&C.

How hard is locking-up hard drives and securing our bytes and bits.

According to the article, we have a huge problem keeping educated, talented computer scientists in goverment's ranks.

It's unfathomable to me as to how this could be the case.  Are the CS guys turning-tail and taking-up jobs with the USPS after their brief tenures with the DoD.  Does this explain why my Netflix-order of "Get Lamp" was stolen in transit?

Anecdote:

Shortly after a long bit of waiting in a line for my turn to look at the US Constitution in the National Archives, which wasn't horribly bad because I had a PB&J to snack on, a gaggle of men wearing black-suits and ear-canal microphones walked in and looked-around either wistfully and in-frustration.  I don't know which.

The leader announced that the DoD has somehow determined that there was a threat on our country's most sacred document and that nobody else would be allowed inside and that everyone inside would be free to complete their examination of the parchment.

So anyhow, after snapping a few photos through the glass case and walking outside, I approached one of the black-clad men and asked for directions to the gift shop.

He cracked-up and told me not to bother him again.  Then came through a static-y sounding transmission on his radio that suggested falsified traffic and uh... other listeners?

If I, a teenager then, could determine that the DoD was making use of falsified radio traffic, then I wonder exactly what the standard is for determining whether or not a network qualifies as infiltrated.
  
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It's about time that sombody admitted this...

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