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Topic Summary - Displaying 7 post(s).
Posted by: TossedByWaves75
Posted on: Nov 22nd, 2021 at 3:29am
  Mark & QuoteQuote
Okay, thanks. I guess I misread what you said. I thought it could be a control question since part of it involves the intention as to why you're in that place. I thought intentions weren't able to be polygraphed for.

Again, thanks!
Posted by: George W. Maschke
Posted on: Nov 20th, 2021 at 4:32am
  Mark & QuoteQuote
Why do/did you think that the question about going where children congregate (when that's a violation of your probation) might be a "control" question? It seems clear to me that it's a relevant question.
Posted by: TossedByWaves75
Posted on: Nov 20th, 2021 at 3:33am
  Mark & QuoteQuote
Hello, George,

I understand that part, I'm trying to figure out why it's a control question and not a relevant one, since going where children congregate is also against our probation.

I read in the book that we're to ask ourselves about every question: is this something they would expect everyone to have done? In my opinion, the PO wouldn't expect that every one of his probationers had hung around a playground for the purpose of gawking at children.

This is the only question that really makes me nervous because I don't want to be causing a reaction to it without being 100% certain that it is a control question. Just looking for reassurance that it is a control question. Smiley


Posted by: George W. Maschke
Posted on: Oct 17th, 2021 at 8:40am
  Mark & QuoteQuote
TossedByWaves75 wrote on Oct 17th, 2021 at 2:12am:
Being in an area or going into an area where children congregate is a direct violation of our probation. Is it that part of the question that asks about our intention of why we're there that makes it a control question?


I do not understand what you're asking here.

Quote:
Also, why do they ask if we've had alcohol in the last 24 hours before the test?


This question is typically asked to determine whether the subject might be under the lingering effects of any drug. Note that in the case of some probationers, consumption of alcohol is a violation of probation.
Posted by: TossedByWaves75
Posted on: Oct 17th, 2021 at 2:12am
  Mark & QuoteQuote
Thanks for responding, George.

Being in an area or going into an area where children congregate is a direct violation of our probation. Is it that part of the question that asks about our intention of why we're there that makes it a control question? I'm not doubting you, I just want to be absolutely sure it is a control question before I create a reaction.

Also, why do they ask if we've had alcohol in the last 24 hours before the test?

Appreciate your responses! Smiley
Posted by: George W. Maschke
Posted on: Sep 29th, 2021 at 10:23am
  Mark & QuoteQuote
As noted in The Lie Behind the Lie Detector, "control" questions must be identified within the context of the full set of questions.

In post-conviction polygraph programs, the relevant questions generally concern a direct violation of the subject's terms of probation or parole. The "control" questions are often about lying to one's probation officer, therapist, or polygraph operator, or about some sort of "thought crime" that does not involve a violation of probation or parole.

In addition, as noted at p. 152 of the 5th edition of TLBTLD, it may be helpful in identifying control questions to note that polygraph operators tend to introduce the different question types in groups during the "pre-test" phase.
Posted by: TossedByWaves75
Posted on: Sep 29th, 2021 at 6:18am
  Mark & QuoteQuote
How do we know for sure they are control questions?

The one on the list about touching oneself while thinking about a child is similar to that of, Have you gone to places where children congregate for sexual gratification/stimulation . . . I forget how it's worded, but words to that effect. Both are fairly specific, and I would think one would remember having done these things. Although, of course, there are those who would try to deny it no matter what.

A member of my group was busted after failing that question about going where kids congregate.

Also, are all questions concerning honesty, control questions? There were four questions I was asked about honesty not including the throwaway question about lying to my PO, my therapist and the group. He ended by asking if I'd been honest during the test. Which I had been.

Assuming these are all control questions, would they account for most of the control questions on the test?
 
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