1  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Polygraph Policy / Probable-Lie "Control" Question Leads to Impertinent Admission in Security Clearance Polygraph
 on: Jul 29th, 2022 at 9:53am 
Today's New York Times features an article by filmmaker and U.S. Navy veteran Khalid Abdulqaadir titled, "The Polygraph Test that Saved My Marriage."

During a polygraph for a security clearance, and apparently unaware that answers to probable-lie "control" questions (in this case, "Have you ever kept a secret from your wife?") are secretly expected to be untrue, Abdulqaadir answered "yes" and provided deeply personal information that was not actually relevant, but that is now part of his permanent record. Excerpt;

Quote:
“Have you ever kept a secret from your wife?” asked the polygraph examiner.

For nearly two decades I had been grooming myself to be the perfect candidate for one of the premier U.S. government intelligence agencies. These institutions require absolute loyalty, which means you are supposed to keep secrets for them, not from them.

“Yes, I have,” I replied.

I was seated upright, brown knuckling the plastic arms of the chair. A black coiled wire had been placed snugly across my chest and another contraption was attached to my fingertips. My heart thumped so loudly that it nearly drowned out all sound. I felt a bead of sweat roll from my armpit down my side underneath my shirt.

I was experiencing the telling of truth.

While every fiber of my being strained to keep my secrets, I knew I had to be honest and just answer his question.

Fumbling through my response, I explained how I hadn’t told my wife about my family’s complicated past, how my father’s associations had led him to be charged with terrorist-related crimes after the attacks of Sept. 11, and how I, as his son, was placed on a terrorist suspect list when I turned 18.

Although my father ultimately was found not guilty of these charges in federal court (while being convicted on a gun-related charge), the stigma remained. In fact, one of the main reasons I joined the military and pursued work in the intelligence community was to try to cleanse us of all that by creating a long record of loyalty in serving my country, a record I did create and that I’m proud of.

I had been interrogated by intelligence officers when I was in the Navy, but that was nothing compared to this. Back then, I sweated and cried, but I was innocent, and I knew it. This was different. I was guilty of having hidden things from my wife — and not only about me but my family’s past.

She and I had long been distant in our marriage — a distance that came from a lack of self-disclosure. We met in Japan when I was stationed there. Early on, I had good reason to be quiet and cagey about my personal life; it’s not exactly an appealing come-on to tell a new date that you were placed on a terrorist suspect list or that your father was accused of terrorist ties. Once you’re accustomed to hiding your past, you tend to keep hiding in all kinds of ways.

I had done research before the polygraph and learned that the reason they want to know how we deal with secrets we may be keeping from loved ones is to understand how we would behave with secrets between ourselves and the agency. Could we protect U.S. national security? Would we be susceptible to blackmail or coercion?

“Why have you kept this from your wife?” the examiner asked.

“I was afraid she wouldn’t love me in the same way.”

That, too, was the truth. I have always been terrified of how people might respond to my true self, which is why for most of my life I have tried to offer a version of myself that I believed others wanted to see. When I was growing up in Oklahoma, I would think, “I’m black, ugly, short and have an Islamic name. How could anyone find me attractive?” Having such an attitude could become a self-fulfilling prophecy. As it turned out, it was my struggle to break free from the shame placed on my family that ultimately delivered me from my inferiority complex.

“Have you ever been part of an organization with the purpose of overthrowing the U.S. government?” the examiner asked.

“No,” I said.

“What is it you’re not telling me?” he asked.

I could have started with my excuses. How losing my mother at age 3 made me seek the nurturing affection of women, and how that became a particular kind of weakness. But no. What would be the point of that? I just had to say it: “I had an extramarital affair.”

This was not something I had told anyone. And under normal circumstances, I believed this admission would be a deal breaker for a marriage or this job. It indicates the untrustworthiness and overall lack of character of someone who was likely unfit for a job or a union.

When it came to the job, though, coming clean could work in my favor, as I presumably would be less vulnerable to coercion or blackmail. What my admission would mean for my marriage, however, was decidedly less certain.

I have to say that had it not been for this top-secret security clearance process, I probably never would have told my wife — or anyone else — that I had cheated on her. And in taking full responsibility for my actions, I wasn’t hoping to absolve myself from shaming or criticism. I am a man who behaved badly but now takes ownership of his betrayals and failures; it’s as simple as that. Thus began the real clearance process, which was seeking passage into the bureau of marriage.

“He’s good,” the examiner said, giving a thumbs-up to another agent.

I was surprised that I passed the polygraph test, but later I realized of course I did — because I had told the truth.


Although Abdulqaadir professes to have "done research before the polygraph," it is clear that he didn't look very deeply into polygraphy, as he evidently didn't understand the function of probable-lie "control" questions. Had he done his homework, he would not have allowed the polygraph operator to turn the polygraph suite into a confessional booth.

In addition, his statement that "of course" he passed, because he had told the truth, betrays deep naïveté about the validity of polygraphy. As retired CIA polygrapher John Sullivan has opined, "...an honest subject has no better chance than a dishonest subject of getting through the process."

Abdulqaadir's passing the polygraph likely has as much (or more) to do with good luck (and his years in the navy) as it does with his candor.

2  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Polygraph Policy / Re: List: U.S. Fed Employee Criminals - All Passed Polys
 on: Jul 25th, 2022 at 1:22pm 
On July 13, 2022, a jury found Schulte guilty on all accounts.  At his first trial Schulte was found guilty of contempt of court and of making false statements to the F.B.I. though the jury hung on the Vault 7 leaks.  Now he has been convicted on nine counts related to the Vault 7 leaks, which included illegally gathering national defense information and illegally transmitting that information.  No sentencing date has been set.

He is still facing child porn charges too.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/13/nyregion/cia-engineer-joshua-schulte-theft-co...

3  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Post-Conviction Polygraph Programs / Re: Various PCSOT polygraph questions
 on: Jul 21st, 2022 at 3:36am 
Wow. Good luck to you fighting city hall. The object lesson you're missing is power and control - over you. If you think you have any power, rights, protection, etc., here's a tip: you don't.

You're not going to beat the system, and playing games with the entities in your containment circle is a recipe for a lot of misery - on your end.

Is it fair? Absolutely not. Aside from the farce of the polygraph, suck it up and do your time in whatever program you're in. You obviously made a mistake, so own up to that, grow, and move on (which you allude to). Haggling over testing conditions or types of questions you can be asked will get you nowhere. Keep a low profile and stay off of your PO's radar. There are plenty of knuckleheads on supervision who can take up that time and attention for you.

Advertising your background here isn't the smartest move. What can people figure out? Generally where you live (9th Circuit), your more local area has one approved provider (so probably not a larger metro area), you have testing history (and a result set to match on), sounds like you're in a new program having left one (for whatever reason, such as moving, being kicked out for being unmanageable, etc.), and likely college educated based on your writing. Plus you have a fed beef (vs state), so your peer population is a lot smaller to search through. I wouldn't think it would be hard to identify you were I a federal PO reading this.

You can follow your terms and conditions, tell the truth during testing and beat the exam, or you can not follow the T&Cs, lie about it, and beat the exam. That's really the short and sweet of your situation. If you're in the former mindset, and want to protect yourself from bogus results and the consequences that follow, that's understandable (and it means you may have to lie about what you know about polygraphs, or how you answer "Are you using any countermeasures today?"), and not no one, but less people would fault you for that. Those people being others who've been screwed over by being deemed deceptive when you know g-d well you were telling the truth.

4  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Off-Topic Posts / Re: NSA's usage of Remote Neural Monitoring (RNM)
 on: Jul 14th, 2022 at 10:30pm 
Remote neural monitoring is real.
voice to Skull is real.
Gangstalking is real.
It is being used on targeted individuals who have no place to report these crimes as it is used for elitist agenda.

5  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Polygraph Procedure / Re: CM tips--truth wasn't enough, tilting the odds in my favor...
 on: Jul 14th, 2022 at 7:03am 
CarlBrutananadilewski wrote on Jul 13th, 2022 at 7:49pm:
Because being completely honest led to an 'inconclusive' poly result, consistent with how I have read that truthful people are at a disadvantage, I am now looking at interventions to tilt the odds more in my favor. 

Searching on the various forums, I have seen a number of people who recommend buying some home version “Lie Detector,” which they don't explain but usually seems to be just a GSR measure, and they describe the importance of 'practicing' their mental and physiological responses to an audio recording of a mock test they create.  There are a number of dead and very old links to these devices—any recommendations for a GSR device that is currently available and that has (relatively) good reviews and is under 200$?  Is it worthwhile to look for something that measures both GSR and temperature?


I am not able to recommend any such device. About a decade ago, I purchased a device marketed as a "USB Polygraph" by a company called Swamiware. But it was basically junk. The accompanying software was particularly bad.

Note that typical polygraph instruments do not measure the subject's body temperature.

Quote:
When creating the mock test to 'practice' the questions, using the Comparison Question format, from some dated materials and this forum, I have read the tests consist of anywhere from two relevant questions to fourteen relevant questions per test.  To best imitate real life and current practices, what is the most common number of relevant questions per test nowadays on that format, and corresponding with that number you offer, what would be the most common number of irrelevant and control questions?—I want to make sure I get my proportions right.


Based on your previous posts, I infer that you are facing post-conviction polygraph screening. The most commonly used technique used for this purpose seems to be the Air Force Modified General Question Test (AFMGQT). For details on this technique, see the associated administration guide.

Quote:
After reading TLBTLD several times, I just read Doug Williams' very brief Sting book, which did seem to have good information on breathing patterns I haven't seen in TLBTLD, on how to make sure your breathing doesn't appear controlled, with the jagged edge patterns.  However, he described the GSR response as unimportant, and said that it is controlled by your breathing and cardio responses, but I have read GSR described as the most important measure here in this forum, but haven't read of specific interventions for it.  For control questions, along with scary mental imagery of being devoured by large predators while hopelessly punching them in the face, slightly shallower breathing for 5 secs, I visualize my finger tips in molten lava and I can feel them pulse. Once I get a GSR device, I will see if that fingertip visualization actually registers.  Any thoughts on the importance of GSR in general compared to other measures and fingertip visualization (or other GSR intervention) in particular?


I do not think that persons practicing polygraph countermeasures need be concerned about jagged respiratory tracings. The GSR channel is not unimportant. It is not less important than the other channels.

Quote:
I have read some inconsistent information on the forum on mental imagery responses to Irrelevant questions.  Some people posting here stated they use the same relaxing mental imagery and breathing pattern for Irrelevant questions as they do for Relevant questions (assuming it isn't an R-I test), which doesn't make sense to me.  I would think that I would aim to have the very least response to Relevant, a mild response to Irrelevant (which I've read aren't scored), and a major response to Control questions.  I would think that my steady breathing pattern would be the same for Irrelevant as Relevant, but that I wouldn't use any relaxing mental imagery for Irrelevant questions—your thoughts?

Thanks in advance--CB.


Your notion that one would want to show a mild response to irrelevant questions is mistaken. Polygraph operators don't expect to see reactions to them, and to the extent that they do, they may interpret that as evidence of polygraph countermeasures.

Note that there is no research evidence on the effects of using relaxing mental imagery as a polygraph countermeasure.

6  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Polygraph Procedure / CM tips--truth wasn't enough, tilting the odds in my favor...
 on: Jul 13th, 2022 at 7:49pm 
Because being completely honest led to an 'inconclusive' poly result, consistent with how I have read that truthful people are at a disadvantage, I am now looking at interventions to tilt the odds more in my favor. 

Searching on the various forums, I have seen a number of people who recommend buying some home version “Lie Detector,” which they don't explain but usually seems to be just a GSR measure, and they describe the importance of 'practicing' their mental and physiological responses to an audio recording of a mock test they create.  There are a number of dead and very old links to these devices—any recommendations for a GSR device that is currently available and that has (relatively) good reviews and is under 200$?  Is it worthwhile to look for something that measures both GSR and temperature?

When creating the mock test to 'practice' the questions, using the Comparison Question format, from some dated materials and this forum, I have read the tests consist of anywhere from two relevant questions to fourteen relevant questions per test.  To best imitate real life and current practices, what is the most common number of relevant questions per test nowadays on that format, and corresponding with that number you offer, what would be the most common number of irrelevant and control questions?—I want to make sure I get my proportions right.

After reading TLBTLD several times, I just read Doug Williams' very brief Sting book, which did seem to have good information on breathing patterns I haven't seen in TLBTLD, on how to make sure your breathing doesn't appear controlled, with the jagged edge patterns.  However, he described the GSR response as unimportant, and said that it is controlled by your breathing and cardio responses, but I have read GSR described as the most important measure here in this forum, but haven't read of specific interventions for it.  For control questions, along with scary mental imagery of being devoured by large predators while hopelessly punching them in the face, slightly shallower breathing for 5 secs, I visualize my finger tips in molten lava and I can feel them pulse. Once I get a GSR device, I will see if that fingertip visualization actually registers.  Any thoughts on the importance of GSR in general compared to other measures and fingertip visualization (or other GSR intervention) in particular?

I have read some inconsistent information on the forum on mental imagery responses to Irrelevant questions.  Some people posting here stated they use the same relaxing mental imagery and breathing pattern for Irrelevant questions as they do for Relevant questions (assuming it isn't an R-I test), which doesn't make sense to me.  I would think that I would aim to have the very least response to Relevant, a mild response to Irrelevant (which I've read aren't scored), and a major response to Control questions.  I would think that my steady breathing pattern would be the same for Irrelevant as Relevant, but that I wouldn't use any relaxing mental imagery for Irrelevant questions—your thoughts?

Thanks in advance--CB.

7  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Post-Conviction Polygraph Programs / Re: Question list
 on: Jul 12th, 2022 at 2:53am 
Thanks. I could have sworn there was a more in depth list posted here awhile back. I think it was specific to SOTP.

8  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Post-Conviction Polygraph Programs / Re: Question list
 on: Jul 11th, 2022 at 8:55pm 
There is a list of potential "control" questions used in post-conviction polygraph screening, though it doesn't include all possible "control" questions (no such list exists). You'll find the list to which I'm referring pinned at the top of this sub-forum. Here's a direct link:

https://antipolygraph.org/cgi-bin/forums/YaBB.pl?num=1456979483

9  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Post-Conviction Polygraph Programs / Question list
 on: Jul 11th, 2022 at 7:21pm 
Wasn't there a list of control questions on this site detailing all possible post conviction test control questions?

10  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Action Alerts and Announcements / Free Webinar: Polygraphs and deception detection: past, present and AI-powered future?
 on: Jul 5th, 2022 at 5:48am 
This Thursday, 7 July at 9:00 AM U.S. Eastern time (2:00 PM UK time), a webinar titled "Polygraphs and deception detection: past, present and AI-powered future?" is to be held. Registration is required, but is free:

https://turing-uk.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hkAijbW0RB-azIAoAf0o-g

Speakers include Don Grubin, the major academic proponent of polygraphy in the UK, Jennifer Brown, a forensic psychologist, and Amit Katwala, a science writer and author of the recent book, Tremors in the Blood: Murder, Obsession, and the Birth of the Lie Detector.

 
  Top