1  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Post-Conviction Polygraph Programs / Re: About those embarrassing control questions
 on: Nov 22nd, 2021 at 3:29am 
Okay, thanks. I guess I misread what you said. I thought it could be a control question since part of it involves the intention as to why you're in that place. I thought intentions weren't able to be polygraphed for.

Again, thanks!

2  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Share Your Polygraph or CVSA Experience / Polygraph for Cyber Security
 on: Nov 21st, 2021 at 10:54pm 
I applied for a cybersecurity position with a government agency at Ft. Meade Maryland and proceeded through the interview process including a polygraph exam and psychological evaluation.

A few weeks after the last steps in the process, I was contacted and told that my application was declined because of "unspecified personality issues" with no additional information.

I was pissed. I am a very well known and prominent expert and one of the smarted people in cybersecurity field. I served in the US military and have held security clearances prior.

This proved to me that the polygraph and psychological evaluation processes are a sham.

3  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Post-Conviction Polygraph Programs / Re: About those embarrassing control questions
 on: Nov 20th, 2021 at 4:32am 
Why do/did you think that the question about going where children congregate (when that's a violation of your probation) might be a "control" question? It seems clear to me that it's a relevant question.

4  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Post-Conviction Polygraph Programs / Re: About those embarrassing control questions
 on: Nov 20th, 2021 at 3:33am 
Hello, George,

I understand that part, I'm trying to figure out why it's a control question and not a relevant one, since going where children congregate is also against our probation.

I read in the book that we're to ask ourselves about every question: is this something they would expect everyone to have done? In my opinion, the PO wouldn't expect that every one of his probationers had hung around a playground for the purpose of gawking at children.

This is the only question that really makes me nervous because I don't want to be causing a reaction to it without being 100% certain that it is a control question. Just looking for reassurance that it is a control question. Smiley



5  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Off-Topic Posts / Re: Signal and Protonmail Providing User Info to Law Enforcement - Still Anonymous?
 on: Nov 18th, 2021 at 4:02pm 
Good response, George.  I encourage everyone who wants an anonymous email account, such as Protonmail, to create and only access via Tor.  Remember, your IP address is always logged and the minute you login to any account or access any website with your real IP address, it is logged.  Who knows how long until those logs are erased or overwritten.  If a court order does subpoena your Protonmail info, they should gain no IP addresses that can trace back to you if you only accessed the account via Tor.

For those that use Signal, if the police take your phone while it is unlocked, they will probably see your Signal messages and the phone number of who you were contacting.  So much for anonymity unless that person used a burner phone.

Session seems like the best bet.  Session is new, so this Troll_of_Truth has not explored Session yet, but when I do will provide updates.

In summary, it seems that using Tor is still the most secure method for internet activity.

As far as that Harvard student, Eldo Kim, who got "caught using Tor," it was because he confessed.  The police assumed that a campus bomb threat might just be made by a student, then the police saw that the bomb threats came from Tor and looked into anyone using Tor at the time.  Kim confessed to using Tor and making the bomb threat.  The last sentence in that article states: "And to think he could have had gotten away with it had he just used the wireless internet at a local Cambridge coffee shop."  This is true.  An anonymous coffee shop would have provided him with a bit more anonymity, though police could have checked cameras to see who was logged in during the time of the alleged crime.

The police had no idea what Kim was doing on Tor.  Kim could have just kept quiet and maybe walked.  Similar to the polygraph where the number one rule is make no confessions.  However, Kim was cornered and confessed and that is what did him in.

6  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Off-Topic Posts / Re: Signal and Protonmail Providing User Info to Law Enforcement - Still Anonymous?
 on: Nov 18th, 2021 at 3:28pm 
Indeed, corporations are required to comply with court orders in their respective countries. Note, however, that since the time when ProtonMail was compelled to record the IP address used by a particular account to log in, it has won a legal challenge. "[T]he Swiss Federal Administrative Court confirmed that email services cannot be considered telecommunications providers, and consequently are not subject to the data retention requirements imposed on telecommunications providers:"

https://protonmail.com/blog/court-strengthens-email-privacy/

While Signal must answer court orders, it retains very little information to hand over.

Security and anonymity are not the same. ProtonMail and Signal both provide excellent security, but to use them anonymously requires particular care. One can use a ProtonMail account anonymously by creating it over the Tor network and only ever accessing the account via Tor.

Signal can also be used anonymously, but this poses special challenges, because Signal requires the use of a telephone number.

Among messaging apps, Session may well provide the best combination of both anonymity and security.

Tor makes it possible to use the internet anonymously, although there are ways that one's anonymity can be compromised while using Tor. The case of the Harvard student who sent a hoax bomb threat using Tor Browser comes to mind:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/runasandvik/2013/12/18/harvard-student-receives-f-f...

7  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Off-Topic Posts / Signal and Protonmail Providing User Info to Law Enforcement - Still Anonymous?
 on: Nov 18th, 2021 at 1:58pm 
It appears that no company is immune to a court order from law enforcement for the data that the company retains. 

https://thehackernews.com/2021/09/protonmail-shares-activists-ip-address.html

https://www.zdnet.com/article/signal-unveils-how-far-us-law-enforcement-will-go-...

https://signal.org/bigbrother/santaclara/

The only option is for these companies not to retain ANY data (no IP addresses, login info, etc.).  Maybe the Session app and Tor are the two most anonymous services.  Thoughts?

8  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / Polygraph Policy / Re: How Did CIA Officer and Serial Sexual Abuser Brian Jeffrey Raymond Get Away With His Crimes for So Long?
 on: Nov 17th, 2021 at 3:05pm 
On October 25, 2021, the FBI confirmed that Brian Jeffrey Raymond was in fact, a CIA officer.

https://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field-offices/washingtondc/news/press-releases/se...

9  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / CVSA and other Voice Stress Analysis Applications / Re: Notes on Meeting of Creditors in NITV LLC Bankruptcy Case
 on: Nov 16th, 2021 at 6:33am 
Quote:
Any news on the business failure/bankruptcy of the sham organization NITV?


Not really. As expected, the court did issue an order formally approving the employment of Scott Zappolo as special litigation counsel. You can keep an eye on the docket in this case here:

https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/60327608/nitv-llc/

10  Polygraph and CVSA Forums / CVSA and other Voice Stress Analysis Applications / Re: Notes on Meeting of Creditors in NITV LLC Bankruptcy Case
 on: Nov 15th, 2021 at 8:59pm 
Any news on the business failure/bankruptcy of the sham organization NITV?

 
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